Iona

Iona_north_beach_640

“If you want the truth,
I’ll tell you the truth:
Listen to the secret sound,
the real sound,
which is inside you.”
Kabir

For the last three years I’ve been part of Roselle Angwin‘s Islands of the heart writing retreat on Iona. I attend to recharge my writing batteries, to spend time on a remote Hebridean island, for community with other writers and thinkers, and to benefit from Roselle’s adept group leadership. The retreat reminds me of one way to lead a writer’s life. I like to rise early. Keep a notebook to hand. Walk. Spend time in silence. There’s a lot of free-writing, reading , and play (writing exercises; games). Community with the other writers present is a huge part of the experience.

In part, I go to Iona to revisit the insights I found when I was effectively penned in my flat for ten months during cancer treatment, so easily lost in the hurly-burly of daily life with “no evidence of disease.”

I find the words flow so easily in Iona. This year I’ve come back with over 20 embryonic poems. Of course many will be discarded, and they all without exception, need to compost in my notebook / laptop before I work out what’s reusable. There’s no doubt it’s a huge privilege to be able to travel to Iona to write. On this remote island, this year, I seem to have written some of my most political poems yet.

 

Permission and Audre Lorde

alcoversI’ve spent the last couple of months intermittently chasing permission to quote the late, great Audre Lorde as an epigram to one of the poems in Wristwatch.

My poem Possibility (you’ll have to wait for the collection to read it) is a direct response to the epilogue of A Burst of Light (1988, now collected in I am your sister). Lorde, facing death, urges engagement with every hour of life. I want to quote and acknowledge Lorde partly to give my poem context, but also because I hope it will send more readers to her original writing. I find her as necessary in 2017 as she ever was. Read her poem Who said it was simple.

At the start of my chemo (2013) I remembered Lorde had written extensively about her own cancer treatment, and there, waiting for me on my bookcase were The Cancer Journals and A Burst of Light. Struggling to make sense of my own illness and mortality, I found her words were incisive, challenging, fierce, particularly about the intersection of breast cancer, race, and sexuality. Lorde doesn’t mince her words. She also faces her disease and prognosis with courage and dignity. I’m proud to call her a role model. How old fashioned that sounds!

So began my quest to identify the literary estate of Audre Lorde.

I initially emailed Harper Collins, the publishers of my (now out of print) UK edition containing Burst of Light, using the format recommended by Jane Friedman.  I was referred on to a literary agency, which referred me back to Harper Collins. The trail went cold. I was issued with a letter from Harper Collins saying I could use the quotation at my own risk.

I tried another tack. As  lapsed librarian, I suspected that the archives holding Lorde’s papers might be able to help. After some googling, I emailed the archivist at Spelman College. By return she put me in touch with Lorde’s literary executor and within 24 hours I had the permission I need. Another pre-publication job done.

And today I am once again engrossed in my Audre Lorde books. They are as powerful as ever.

 

Reading at Shore Poets

I’m the new poet at Shore Poet’s February event.

Sunday 26 February 2017
7pm (doors open 630pm)
Oh! Outhouse, 12a Broughton Street Lane, Edinburgh, EH1 3LY
Admission: £5 (concessions £3)

 

Afterword

I always enjoy an evening at Shore Poets – – they are so well organised and curated, with a good balance of music, new and established poets (and of course the legendary lemon cake). I’d been looking forward to being the New Poet since I was invited. A slightly longer set than previously for me – but my voice held up for the full 15 minutes. Thanks to all who cam to support me and to those who came and chatted afterwards. And it was an honour to meet and perform alongside the talented Cera Impala, Ian McDonough, and Kevin Cadwallender.

LGBT+ History Month – spoken word celebration

On Monday 13th February I’m reading at a spoken word celebration for LGBT+ history month.

Venue – Leith Depot, 1900 – 2300.

Afterword:

I had a blast – what a great night, and what a variety of performers and poems. It’s the first time I’ve pulled together an exclusively LGBT+ set, and I was a bit worried it included some of my darker poems – but the audience laughed in the right places. Thanks to everyone who came up and chatted afterwards or who messaged me. The best reward for me as a writer is to know I connected with the listener / reader.

Would be great for this night to become a more regular event. There’s definitely an appetite and a space for it. No pressure, organisers. 🙂